The Last Word

In 25 years of ministry, it seems like I have spent more time in church meetings talking about roofs than just about anything else. While I might prefer to focus on weightier matters, having a solid roof over our heads is a fundamental human need – right after food, water and clothing. It becomes all the more significant when we recognize the building in which we worship is indeed “our Father’s house.” Like so many other things, we are called to be good stewards of it.

This week, most of you have received a letter, pledge card and return envelope for “It’s Our Father’s House,” a capital campaign aimed at the ongoing upkeep and maintenance of our church building. The most immediate need is new shingles for our sanctuary and chapel. Due to the “great hurricane of 2008,” the Christian Education wing and fellowship hall have already been re-shingled at the expense of our property insurance. In order to have shingles that match and to take advantage of lower costs, we have made the commitment to move ahead with reproofing the parts of our church building that are most holy to us.

Undoubtedly, with a building that is 50 years old, we are going to have additional capital expenses in the future. We want to be prepared when those needs arise. This time, we received an unexpected blessing when half the cost of a new roof was provided for us. Next time, that will almost certainly not be the case.

Your pledge/gift to “It’s Our Father’s House” is one way you can help us to be good stewards of the building that is the home of our worship, study, fellowship and so much more. It is also a way of investing in the future of Central Christian Church – of showing confidence in God’s ability to use us in serving his purposes and his people in the years

ahead.

We are now in the midst of Holy Week. I’m reminded of Jesus’ words to his disciples in that final week when he said, “Destroy this temple, and I will rebuild it again in three days.” Of course, Jesus wasn’t saying that the temple wasn’t important. His parents took him there to be blessed as an infant, he went back again at the age to 12 to talk with the elders, and he returned other times in his life to that place that was the center of Israel’s worship. But Jesus’ words pointed beyond the kingdom of this world – even its holy places – to the resurrection that was coming. What happened on Easter created a new reality – a new life that transcends the supposed “reality” of this world – even death itself.

We have so much for which to be thankful – our beautiful church building included. However, we also know that it is all in the service of Jesus – who lived and died and was raised again that we might have life and have it abundantly, both now and forever. That is the Good News we are here to proclaim. Happy Easter!